Green Design

Updated: Jan 4

Brief


2 A5 Flyers

2 Bus Ads

2 Social Media Posts


Sectors chosen: Food and Diets and Culture- Solutions and Positive Futures


Food and Diets Culture


Solutions Positive Futures


Written Report- Write in third person!


"Research to date has concluded to..."

"This has led to..."


Zero Carbon Britain


CAT stands for Centre of Alternative Technology


It is an charity organization focusing on improving the world's climate attempting to reach net zero carbon in Britain and to be a role model for the world.


"CAT’s mission is to inspire, inform and enable people to achieve practical solutions for sustainability".


Focused on electricity, heat, transport, industry and land-use to teach students and engage with governments and campaigners. Action is required at all ages and they preach that we have everything we need right now to make this difference.


CAT's 'Zero Carbon Britain' project

  • Inspire, Inform, Enable

  • We have everything we need

  • Need all action, individuals/communities/businesses/governments

  • ACT NOW

  • Benefits of Coronavirus

  • Cleaner air/active transport

  • Empower people to take action, show the campus

  • Both factual and emotive


Reduce Beef Consumption Poster


For this poster I did some research on beef and land use around the world inspired by "A Crude Awakening Film" and the National Geographic documentary with Leonardo Dicaprio.


I was very inspired by many beef and vegan posters made previously by campaigns such as Greenpeace and Meat Free Mondays.



Food and Diets


Zero Carbon Britain- Land Use

https://www.cat.org.uk/info-resources/zero-carbon-britain/research-reports/zero-carbon-britain-rising-to-the-climate-emergency/ - Zero Carbon Britain: Rising to the Climate Emergency


  • Emissions associated with food production, land use changes and land management practices – this accounts for around 10% of current UK emissions.

  • Agricultural systems are threatened with reduced productivity due to a decline in the numbers and variety of plants and animals in farmland and the surrounding environment. This variety of life is necessary for efficient food production. Therefore, our land management practice must include restoring essential biodiversity.

  • Our model explores how we can achieve this whilst also reducing agricultural emissions, providing a healthier mix of foods, reducing unnecessary food imports, producing building materials, providing UK sourced biomass, and increasing natural carbon capture to ‘balance’ our residual emissions. In doing this, the UK will become more self-reliant and can clean up its own mess within its own territory. This is a vital piece in the net zero carbon jigsaw.

"Through dietary change, food waste reduction and improved agricultural practices we could provide a healthy, sustainable diet for the whole UK population."


Food and Diets Model:

This model shows the positive impacts of eating plant based protein sources like nuts and seeds and meat alternatives, you only need 360g of nuts and seeds to get 50g of protein and this has a significant reduce in land use and greenhouse emissions compared to beef and eggs that take up a lot of land to produce and release a lot more greenhouse gases.


Land Use

https://ourworldindata.org/environmental-impacts-of-food


Beef and Lamb take up most of the land for food product globally with lamb 369.81 m2 and 326.21 m2 where as nuts only take up 12.96 m2


Greenpeace- Meat and dairy

https://www.greenpeace.org.uk/challenges/meat-and-dairy/


"In the last few decades food companies have filled our shelves with meat, chocolate, cheese and eggs, which has resulted in an explosion of livestock numbers – especially cows, pigs and chickens. There are now so many that an estimated 60% of all mammals on the planet are livestock, while just 4% are wild (the other 36% is us). Farmed poultry account for an incredible 70% of all birds."


"Animal agriculture is a really inefficient way to produce enough food for everyone on the planet. For every 100 calories of crops fed to animals, we get 40 calories in the form of milk, 12 calories of chicken, and just 3 calories of beef.  Instead, that grain could be used to feed people directly and would help ensure everyone has enough food." 



Solutions:


"To keep global temperature increases below 1.5ºC, we need to reduce the amount of meat and dairy we’re eating by more than half by 2030. That means big companies need to start producing tasty, healthy plant-based meals – and reduce the amount of meat and dairy products too. What meat we do eat has to be produced ecologically, respecting both the environmental impacts and the welfare of the animals themselves."


"We also need to hold governments and companies accountable for the damage food production is causing and demand a more responsible approach. In this way, we can stop destroying forests to rear animals and grow crops to feed them."


  • we need to reduce the amount of meat and dairy we’re eating by more than half by 2030

  • hold governments and companies accountable

  • stop destroying forests to rear animals and grow crops to feed them


Meat Free Mondays

https://www.meatfreemondays.com/


Think About the Animals


"Billions of animals are farmed and killed for meat each year. Most of them are raised in intensive factory farms, in cramped, overcrowded cages, sheds and pens. With no room to stretch limbs or wings and no access to daylight or fresh air, intensively reared animals are often diseased, injured and dying due to the unnatural conditions they are kept in. Farmed animals are subjected to mutilations such as having their beaks clipped, their teeth pulled out and their tails docked to stop them from pecking and wounding each other through boredom and frustration. All farmed animals end their lives with a brutal death at the slaughterhouse. Choosing plant-based food is a compassionate step that helps prevent cruelty and suffering."


Main Points from Meat Free Mondays poster:

  • 100 football pitches per hour to create room for grazing cattle

  • the average cow reared for meat contributes more to global warming per year than a family car driving 9000 miles

  • a third of all land on Earth is used for livestock production

  • it can take 2350 litres of water to produce one 150g beef burger




Vegetables to Animal "Eat Me Not Him!"


Did you try anything new in lockdown? Why not try...


Fast Fashion


Greenpeace- Fast Fashion

https://www.greenpeace.org.uk/news/fast-fashion-this-industry-needs-an-urgent-makeover/?source=GA&subsource=GOFRNAOAGA034J&gclid=Cj0KCQjwoJX8BRCZARIsAEWBFMKPjLmVtPfeqQSG62R5mqx75pq9TXp4vkFvW0eDFtwEkUz38R_QYaoaAurCEALw_wcB


"The similarities between plastic and fast fashion aren’t immediately obvious, but when you dig a bit deeper they are striking. Clothes are increasingly being produced using oil, the same raw material as single-use plastic, with the proportion of oil-based synthetic fibres in our clothes having doubled since 2000. This is driving continued exploration for fossil fuels that need to stay in the ground."


"In the last 15 years, production of clothing has doubled – and at the same time, between 2000 and 2015 the number of times a garment was worn before it was thrown out decreased by 36%. £140 million worth of clothing is sent to landfill every year in the UK, and more than half of clothing given to charity shops or textile recyclers ends up in landfills or is incinerated."


https://www.ethicalconsumer.org/fashion-clothing/what-fast-fashion-why-it-problem


"While most fashion companies still source the majority of their garments from overseas, some fast fashion brands such as Boohoo, Missguided and ASOS, have ‘reshored’ a substantial part of their production, sourcing garments from the UK, with many products made in Leicester."


Fast Fashion Definition

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fast_fashion


Fast fashion is the term used to describe clothing designs that move quickly from the catwalk to stores to meet new trends. The collections are often based on designs presented at Fashion Week events. Fast fashion allows mainstream consumers to purchase trendy clothing at an affordable price


https://goodonyou.eco/what-is-fast-fashion/


"Fast fashion can be defined as cheap, trendy clothing, that samples ideas from the catwalk or celebrity culture and turns them into garments in high street stores at breakneck speed to meet consumer demand. The idea is to get the newest styles on the market as fast as possible."


Fast Fashion Timeline

  • Before the 1800s, fashion was slow. You had to source your own materials like wool or leather, prepare them, weave them, and then make the clothes.

  • The Industrial Revolution introduced new technology—like the sewing machine. Clothes became easier, quicker, and cheaper to make. Dressmaking shops emerged to cater for the middle classes.

  • A lot of these dressmaking shops used teams of garment workers or home workers. It was around this time that sweatshops emerged, along with some familiar safety issues.

  • By the 1960s and 70s, young people were creating new trends and clothing became a form of personal expression, but there was still a distinction between high fashion and high street.

  • In the late 1990s and 2000s, low-cost fashion reached its zenith. Online shopping took off, and fast fashion retailers like H&M, Zara, and Topshop took over the high street. These brands took the looks and design elements from the top fashion houses and reproduced them quickly and cheaply.


The pressure to reduce costs and speed up production time means that environmental corners are more likely to be cut. Fast fashion’s negative impact includes its use of cheap, toxic textile dyes—making the fashion industry the second largest polluter of clean water globally after agriculture. Cheap textiles also increase fast fashion’s impact. Polyester is one of the most popular fabrics. It is derived from fossil fuels, contributes to global warming, and can shed microfibres that add to the increasing levels of plastic in our oceans when it’s put through the wash. Conventional cotton requires enormous quantities of water and pesticides in developing countries. This results in risks of drought and creates huge amounts on stress on water basins, as well as competition for resources between companies and local communities."


  • reduce costs and speed up production

  • cheap, toxic textile dyes

  • second largest polluter of clean water

  • polyester is increasing levels of plastic in our oceans

  • results in risks of drought and stress on water basins



A Crude Awakening 2006 Film


Notes


Everything is made from oil!


Oil boomed in the 1900's- 1914 first discovery


1922 blowout in Venezuela created exposure to around the world for oil


1920's-1950's USA was the 'Saudi Arabia' of its time


Oil pumps today left unused


Oil starts/prolongs/intensifies wars


USA secured oil fields in Iraq war 2003


Hubbotts Peak Oil theory came true and oil is declining at a rapid rate in many countries and is happening with Saudi Arabia


You can improve technology as much as you want but in the end, oil will dry out...


1970's not many countries used oil except USA, Europe, Canada and parts of Asia. Then the world caught up and wanted what they had


Invest in cleaner energy to prevent oil wars in future- encouraging more ideas to save the planet whilst improving technology and economy etc.




communityclothing.com



Anna Miller


Q. Please answer per picture choice: how successfully (or otherwise) do you feel this solution fits the brief? Please explain your answer.


A. I think it is very successful as it shows what we are doing wrong and how we can improve it in different way, therefore bringing a positive outlook at the current situation we are in. It focuses on more of the individual than organisations which is good as most everyday people will walk past campaigns like this.


Q. What colour schemes have been used in this solution, why do you think this is? Please explain your answer.


A. It's a simple colour pallete of red, orange, green and blues. The shades of these vary either side, there are more dark colors on the left side (current situation) and brighter colors on the right side (potential future).


Q. What visual 'art style' or treatment has been used here (i.e. diagrammatic, pictograms, loose illustrations and/or maybe photographic, vector/flat colour or template mockups maybe)? Do you feel these are appropriate (?) - please explain your answer.


A. Vector/Flat Colour Illustrations, good as I feel you don't need details like faces as it is easier to read.


Q. What type styles have been used here? Do you feel these are appropriate (?) - please explain your answer.


A. Very minimal type here as I dont think its needed as it more about symbolism.


Q. Each solution chosen will have a form of corporate ID across the various elements normally. These may be 'given' ID's or colour schemes/refs as part of the brief (or) ones developed as part of the brief by the students. Do you feel these are appropriate (?) - please explain your answer.


A. I feel they haven't incorporated a place or coorporate ID as much as they could've, they could've included a sense of location or relevance to the organisation related to it.


Q. Elements on the page or design board.. Some solutions are better as simple but effective solutions, looking per chosen item do you feel it's 'complexity' re visual elements is either appropriate, too complicated or maybe too simplistic? Please explain your answer.


A. I feel the design board is a little complicated and repetitive, I know the designs are similar but I think they could have included one large poster showing the main design and then how that is incorporated onto other media.


Q. Does your chosen element or design board use a mockup or photoshop template to help show it in different scenarios in the real world? These can often help best present visuals and (depending on source used) can either be freely aquired or for a small fee. If 'yes' then please explain how these are used in the example and how effective you feel them to be, if 'no' then do you think using these might improve the overall presentation of the final student work?


A. Yes, they have used a mock up in the streets but I feel it could be represented in different mock ups also such as how it is seen on a phone in hand from normal eye distance for example.


Q. Improvements. Looking at each example and already having a summary of the brief, do you feel that your chosen element or board could be further improved still? If 'yes' then please suggest how this might be. If 'no' then please explain why you think they've supplied the optimum solution(s).


A. I think it could be improved by using very simple bold words like THIS OR THIS or PRESENT/FUTURE to help explain it to people quicker as people don't have time to stop and look.


Ben Topp


Q. Please answer per picture choice: how successfully (or otherwise) do you feel this solution fits the brief? Please explain your answer.


A. I really like this design as the main poster is straightforward and catches people attention straight away with the word "TIME" in white and then people read the "we are wasting time", this is more a problem as a collective and not directing it to certain people, therefore creating a positive look on how we can change the situation we are in. The infographic approach is educational at the same time.


Q. What colour schemes have been used in this solution, why do you think this is? Please explain your answer.


A. Mainly green and nude colours in different shades to express the idea of nature and positivity.


Q. What visual 'art style' or treatment has been used here (i.e. diagrammatic, pictograms, loose illustrations and/or maybe photographic, vector/flat colour or template mockups maybe)? Do you feel these are appropriate (?) - please explain your answer.


A. Mostly Infographic and Vector imagery to get a simple but educational approach to the viewer.


Q. What type styles have been used here? Do you feel these are appropriate (?) - please explain your answer.


A. Mainly Sans Serif (I think Futura) which is very bold, there are large titles to get attention and then a lot smaller paragraph text for people interested in more.


Q. Each solution chosen will have a form of corporate ID across the various elements normally. These may be 'given' ID's or colour schemes/refs as part of the brief (or) ones developed as part of the brief by the students. Do you feel these are appropriate (?) - please explain your answer.


A. I feel they have incorporated the zero carbon britain brand well in this design as its not too bold but still left a lot of space at the bottom of the poster design for people to view it easily.


Q. Elements on the page or design board.. Some solutions are better as simple but effective solutions, looking per chosen item do you feel it's 'complexity' re visual elements is either appropriate, too complicated or maybe too simplistic? Please explain your answer.


A. I like the way they have placed the elements on the design board, the large poster shows the main approach to the campaign straight away and then this design is carried down throughout the other designs. The flyer design is great as it is a lot more detailed (as it should be) than the poster so it's more of a in depth approach to the poster with information.


Q. Does your chosen element or design board use a mockup or photoshop template to help show it in different scenarios in the real world? These can often help best present visuals and (depending on source used) can either be freely aquired or for a small fee. If 'yes' then please explain how these are used in the example and how effective you feel them to be, if 'no' then do you think using these might improve the overall presentation of the final student work?


A. No, they haven't used a mock up, I feel they could've use one though especially for the poster design to show it in use and how people will read it. But also, I think with the illustrative and fat approach to the design it works well with the design board being flat.


Q. Improvements. Looking at each example and already having a summary of the brief, do you feel that your chosen element or board could be further improved still? If 'yes' then please suggest how this might be. If 'no' then please explain why you think they've supplied the optimum solution(s).


A. I think it would be great to see a mock up and how the design works in real life. It would be good to see a social media post also.


Concept Ideas


Food and Diets- Solutions

Culture- Positive Futures



Green


https://www.empower-yourself-with-color-psychology.com/meaning-of-colors.html


Sollutions/Positive Future:


Food and Diet

  • "Meat Free Mondays"

  • "Love Food Hate Waste"

  • "You have a choice"

  • "Plant Based Diets"

  • "Did you try anything new in lockdown? Why not try..."

Fast Fashion

  • "Make It Last"

  • "Thrift Clothes"

  • "The Mission to End Emissions"


Facts/Statistics:


Fast Fashion

Food and Diet

  • a third of all land on Earth is used for livestock production

  • it can take 2350 litres of water to produce one 150g beef burger


Final Concepts



Currently working on detailed piece of the character in the T-Shirt:

I have just moved to Illustrator on my iPad to get a vector drawing instead:

Final Concepts- Digital


I have now transferred my designs onto Illustrator on my computer to create the final poster design in the correct dimensions to see how the design looks. Initially I have kept a green background and colour scheme through the design along with a warm/nude colour scheme with the skin colours and meat, this helps contrast parts of the design easier.

I will now experiment with different colour schemes/typography and rearranging elements around the design.



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